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Rose Freeland

Rose Freeland

An ongoing interest in reviewing accepted norms of visual representation and its effects

Rose Freeland

Background

My art encompasses an ongoing interest in reviewing accepted norms of visual representation and its effects while exploring ideas that could change through a more in-depth look at my art practice's digital processes' color and graphics. My work embraces a combined passion for painting and digital photography documentation art practice applied with graphic methods and materials to capture a visual diary of natural environments and humanity.

 

Creating art on a computer and direct paint to canvas renders the identical satisfaction for me. As practical as the computer has become, while nearly every commerce and market experience has some digitalization, I have used the computer as an art tool for thirty years. The core objective of my work aims, through different mediums, to capture a reflective nature of memories and experiences.

 

My past works included Illustrated History of Women, which comprised billboard-sized digitally printed canvases of alternate history. I morphed images of myself onto artifacts and imagery to create the "President of the United States," a picture of a business-suited professional woman behind the Oval Office desk. Another canvas portrayed a Woman on the Moon or Hypatia in the Library of Alexandria. The art simulated painting techniques to generate the fictitious narratives that should be, or potentially could be. The large-scale art printed on canvas fabric by a billboard manufacturer presented an experience of propaganda art banners.

 

After working my way through production to creative director in Nashville, Tennessee, I relocated to California to attend Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. At the Art Center, I had the excellent fortune and guidance of world-class mentors Stephen Prina, Jeremy Gilbert-Roth, Mike Kelly, and Uta Barth. During this time, I embraced art history and a women's voice in the visual arts, as I do today.

 

My current work applies combinations of mediums while exploring my fascination with random beauty in daily objects.

 

Rose Freeland

My Process

When I created my thesis show in 1993 at the California Institute of the Arts created 14 images that were a combination of photos of myself morphed into paintings and digital drawings to express The Illustrated History of Women. My work was novel at the time; no one was using computers yet at school. I printed the work through the same processes as a billboard and utilized large-scale printers in a Los Angeles billboard manufacturer. I have continued to use computer software as an artist's tool and remained a painter with traditional materials, such as oils and panel substrates. 

 

As an artist and sometimes author of books and short stories and poetry, I see my process as an effort to tell a story, if even an experience. The Colorado Series of paintings was created from the memory of my visits to Aspen and tells the color story, but at the same time, I express specific experiences time of day or night. This work is like trying to save a thought or memory to a tangible visual saved moment.  The result is then created as a digital transfer to wood and is a substantial process with custom substrates and framing. I maintain this process is relevant and does not need additional editions of the same painting. The production and completion are of one unique image that locks in a moment in time with art.

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